April202014

Clippers and coiners in 16th-century England

archaeologicalnews:

image

In 2017 a new £1 coin will appear in our pockets with a design extremely difficult to forge. In the mid-16th century, Elizabeth I’s government came up with a series of measures to deter “divers evil persons” from damaging the reputation of English coinage and, with it, the good name of the nation.

The Royal Mint announced last month that in 2017 it will introduce a new £1 coin, said to be the “most secure coin in the world”. The reason behind the decision, which could cost businesses as much as £20 million, is the surge in counterfeiting. It is estimated that around 3% of £1 coins are fakes with an estimated 45 million forgeries in circulation.

Four and a half centuries ago, Elizabeth I made the reform of currency one of her government’s top priorities. Invested as queen in 1558, she inherited a coinage which was fraught with problems. Read more.

10AM
fortressofself:

dude must be really late for school

fortressofself:

dude must be really late for school

(Source: canines-and-things, via ladyoflate)

9AM

oosik:

casethejointfirst:

theolduvaigorge:

Fieldwork revises ice-free corridor hypothesis of human migration

  • by Lauren Milideo

The existence of an ice-free corridor through Canada during the climax of last glaciation, which allowed the first Americans to cross the Bering land bridge from Siberia and move south (about 13,000 years ago), has long been postulated in North American archaeology. Now, research based on the exposure ages of glacial rocks found in the corridor suggests a puzzling conclusion — that the open pathway closed several thousand years prior to 20,000 years ago and didn’t open again until between 13,000 and 12,000 years ago, well after the first Americans were in the Americas.

The findings, presented at last year’s Paleoamerican Odyssey conference, along with other recent findings, may leave researchers back “at square one,” with no conclusive evidence of when or how the first people arrived in North America, says Lionel Jackson, a geologist at Simon Fraser University in British Columbia and a co-author of one of the studies presented at the meeting.

The fundamental question of when and how the first North Americans arrived in the Americas starts with what migration route they took, says Michael Wilson, chair of the department of earth and environmental sciences at Douglas College in British Columbia, who was not involved in the new study. “The key thing was how they got from [the Yukon-Alaska region] down into the midcontinent,” he says. 

For decades, an ice-free corridor between the Laurentide and Cordilleran ice sheets that was open about 13,000 years ago was viewed as the answer. The corridor would have provided entry for the Clovis people, named after Clovis, N.M., where this culture’s telltale stone tools were first found, to travel south through central Alberta into the Americas. “The idea that Clovis was first … was essentially orthodoxy for many years,” Jackson says.

But over the decades, the discovery of several archaeological sites that date to well before the supposed ice-free corridor was open — including Manis Mastodon Site in Washington (dated to 13,800 years ago), Paisley Caves in Oregon (dated to 14,500 years ago), and Monte Verde in Chile (dated to 14,800 years ago) — have chipped away at the Clovis First hypothesis” (read more).

***Interesting. What do you Beringia archaeologists have to say? Any thoughts, oosik?

(Source: Earth Magazine)

The ice free corridor is a wily mistress. I’ve been leaning more towards the Pacific Coastal Route hypothesis myself, but there is little archaeological data to back that up. Call it a hunch, I suppose. I think that one thing that we should all consider, however, is a point that Meltzer makes in “First Peoples in a New World.” When people first arrived in North America, their numbers were incredibly small, and their impact on the landscape in any single place would have almost certainly been very ephemeral. It isn’t until a much larger population is thriving in the Americas that we begin to see archaeological evidence of said population. It isn’t that the earliest sites don’t exist; They must. Our chances of finding them, however, are quite small. Archaeological visibility and total population correlate. The more people there are, the higher the chance of archaeologists finding evidence.

Who knows when the tipping point is? Meltzer estimates a time period of about 5,000 years (I believe but don’t have the book in front of me) before a population (needle) living in the Americas (haystack) would reach a population level where a detectable number of needles were dispersed throughout the haystack. If we consider a gap in the Cordilleran and Laurentide ice sheets at around 25,000 years ago, even Meadowcroft and Paisley Caves are TOO LATE to fit Meltzer’s model, and that means that there are still earlier sites to find!

One last issue that I will briefly point out is that as the Pleistocene ends, at least in North America, a lot of river valleys and sections of exposed continental shelf get obliterated by glacial melt. If waterways were used for exploring the interior of the Americas, the chances that any of these early exploration sites have survived glacial melt are slim. The deeper into antiquity that we look, the greater the chance that there’s nothing left.

The statement above covers most of the issues. The only other things I’d like to point out is the steep continental shelf along the Pacific which, although might more easily point to where these potential older sites might be located, I feel the erosion was probably more extensive in these areas. The other consideration further north is the ice scour with blocks of ice being pushed ashore, that’s going to help eliminate any sort of evidence of coastal occupations along more northerly coastal environments after sea levels began to rise. As for glacial retreat settings, who knows. It would probably be more beneficial to push through those areas in the winter. 

(via canadianarchaeology)

April192014

thegestianpoet:

beastheads:

drlectersoffice:

Dinner Party at Hannibal’s: menu suggestion by Janice Poon

To regain my appetite after recent disheartening events concerning a close friend, I decided to throw a dinner party. I might give you the recipes later; for now, here is the overall menu of appetizers.

  • Heart Tartare in Filo Flowers
  • Squab drumsticks on fresh figs and fig Newtons 
  • Boar’s head with sausage collar and veggie wig-hat
  • Roulade of beef stuffed with sushi rice and chive flowers
  • Crayfish and octopus with trout and squid
  • Jelly timbits stuffed with Foie Gras and timbit slices topped with headcheese

ARE YOU TELLING ME THAT HANNIBAL LECTER

HANNIBAL LECTER

SERVED FUCKING TIMBITS AT HIS PARTY

i’m laughing my ass off oh my god

Timbits are perfect for all ocassions. 

(via proustianrecall)

11PM
cuteosphere:

unicorns are notorious for their hatred of posturing bro culture
(I’m debating making this girl available as a sticker and a shirt.)

cuteosphere:

unicorns are notorious for their hatred of posturing bro culture

(I’m debating making this girl available as a sticker and a shirt.)

(via electrodaggers)

10PM
the-thorster:

lokitude:

….

The Fall Soldier

whoa there satan

the-thorster:

lokitude:

….

The Fall Soldier

whoa there satan

(Source: daryl-the-lil-asskicker, via ferrific)

10PM
pleatedjeans:

apparently, you can name a bird if you adopt it. [x]

pleatedjeans:

apparently, you can name a bird if you adopt it. [x]

(via electrodaggers)

10PM
littlebluepeep:

blueandbluer:

ralphthemouth:

lady—hulk:

It just keeps…… getting. …. better


I don’t need to understand this to support it.

I am so happy this exists in the world

littlebluepeep:

blueandbluer:

ralphthemouth:

lady—hulk:

It just keeps…… getting. …. better

I don’t need to understand this to support it.

I am so happy this exists in the world

(Source: melhoresgifsdomundo, via rodmanstreet)

wut gif 

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9PM

Anonymous asked: Imagine Bucky not long after falling off the cliff and being captured by Hydra. They keep wiping him, but he keeps managing to hold on to something: that Steve will save him - only to break and give in upon finding out his best friend is dead.

imaginebucky:

the first few times they tried to wipe him, it didn’t take. he was too strong, too smart, too goddamn stubborn for them to take away more than a few memories, half-forgotten anyway, nothing he would miss. he knows, even after the wipes start taking away important things (the first time he bandaged up steve in their tiny one bedroom flat; the color of his sister’s eyes, dead for years, but he could always remember those eyes; the way his ma would laugh when he said something stupid; steve’s small frame held against his, trying to keep out the worst of the cold) that somehow, some way, steve will find him. steve will appear above him, just like he did before, larger than life and strong enough for both of them. except, well, steve doesn’t come. it’s been weeks now, the wipes taking more and more of him away (he can’t even remember his name anymore) and the only thing he knows for certain is that steve will come for him. but it’s hard, it’s so hard, to keep fighting, to keep resisting the wipes when the only thing he can hang onto is steve’s name and the certainty that he’ll come. it’s almost a relief then, when zola appears above him, mouth twisted into a cruel grin, whispering “your steve is dead, my boy. nobody’s going to come for you now,” and finally, finally, he lets go 

image

8PM

Overcoming looting and years of war, Iraq Museum moves to reopen

archaeologicalnews:

image

Lamia al-Gailani pulls a folder of crumbling letters from a battered metal cabinet – part of what she considers the secret treasures of the Iraq Museum.

The cabinets hold archives from the beginnings of the venerable institution, established after World War I by Gertrude Bell, the famed British administrator, writer, and explorer. Hundreds of thousands of documents and photographs, neglected until now, hold the untold story of an emerging nation whose borders “Miss Bell” helped to draw.

“Wonderful isn’t it?” says Ms. Gailani, an archaeologist. She pulls out photographs of the Iraq pavilion at the 1938 Paris Expo and a yellowing, typewritten letter from 1921 confirming the appointment of Bell as honorary museum director. “People probably thought these archives don’t exist. These are treasures that no one knows about.” Read more.

Yay!

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